Gmail Tips from the District Tech Committee

In a recent District Technology Committee (DTC) meeting, DTC members shared both comments and tips about Gmail that they had learned since the transition. DTC members pointed out that the transition went smoothly, were happy that the Gmail is very stable and consistent in and out of the district, and enjoyed the seamless integration among Gmail, Google Calendars, and Google Drive. A few DTC members shared some specific tips:
  • Reorganize the Labels (similar to folders) in the left column to improve email organization. In the left column, click More and Manage labels (at the bottom). 
  • Drag and drop attachments from your Desktop or folders directly into and out of emails (great for photos and other images).
  • If you type the word “attachment” as part of your email and you forget to include an attachment, Gmail automatically asks you to add the attachment.
  • Use the Undo Send feature in Google Labs to retract an email within 10 seconds after sending. Click Settings (upper-right corner "gear" icon); select Settings; click the Labs tab (across the top); click to Enable Undo Send.
  • You can now easily set up Barrington 220 email using the Mail app and Calendar app on iPhone, iPad, and Mac OS. Directions available here.
  • Use the Gmail app on iPhone or iPad to keep work and personal email accounts separate. Download the Gmail app here.
  • Select a customized Theme for your Gmail experience. Click Settings (upper-right corner "gear" icon); click Themes; select a Theme
  • Automatic email threading groups emails together (this feature is called “Conversation View.”). You can also turn off this feature: click Settings (upper-right corner "gear" icon); select Settings; click the General tab (across the top); scroll down to find Conversation View and click Conversation view off.
Finally, for anyone who wishes to use email more effectively, an excellent book is available, Send: Why People Email So Badly and How to Do It Better (2010) by David Shipley and Will Schwalbe. This book is not a book about using email systems; rather Send offers “essential strategies to help you both better manage the ever-increasing number of emails you receive and improve the ones you send” (from the publisher’s review).

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